Saturday, March 24, 2007

M*A*S*H up 4077

1 + 1 + 1 = 1
The new math of mashups.

♦Mashup (or mash it up) is a Jamaican Creole term meaning to destroy. In the context of reggae or ska music, it can take on a positive connotation and mean an exceptional performance or event. The term has also been used in hip-hop, especially in cities such as New York and Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Video mashups are the latest genre of mashup. First there were music mashups, where two or more tracks are combined, often with one acapella track by one artist over a second backing track by another.

Then there were software mashups in which two or more sets of data are combined over the Internet to create a new entity. Such as overlaying houses for sale over a Google Map.
Mashup films can be broken down into several predominant styles and tropes. Most of the Mashups found on the internet fall into one category and more or less obey the unwritten rules of that class of film. These categories, are: word associated mashups, which like Danger Mouse’s “Grey Album” unite two disparate source materials by a pun or joke found in the name; transgressive mashups which transgress the sexual norms put forth in a film, often subverting hetero-normative portrayals; and overdubbing mashups, which use the images from a film and replaces the soundtrack with new dialogue or dialogue from another work, which undermines the original narrative.
Mashups based on word associations speak more than just for the wit of the appropriator. In principal, these mashups, when executed well, express some of the central creative tenets of modern found footage filmmaking: 1) Narrative film consistently follows the same filmic grammar and rarely diverts from it, making it easy to unify disparate films because of their similarities; and 2) the formulas inherent in narrative film are so well known by audiences that a few stylistic cues (which have been imitated to the point of cliché) can easily alert an audience to the nature of what they are watching. Using these two principals, mashups are highly successful at parodying more than just the films they chose to amalgamate, but also at critiquing and revealing the tools of narrative filmmaking.

Some exceptional word associated mashups include “Must Love Jaws” a combination of the romantic comedy “Must Love Dogs” and “Jaws” in which music cues and humorous scenes turn visual source material from “Jaws” into a story about a man who falls in love with a shark. 8 1/2 Mile is a mashup of Fellini's film "8 1/2" and Curtis Hanson's "8 Mile." One of the best received mashups to date is word associated: "10 Things I Hate About Commandments."
Video mashups are the latest genre of mashup.

First there were music mashups, where two or more tracks are combined, often with one acapella track by one artist over a second backing track by another.

Then there were software mashups in which two or more sets of data are combined over the Internet to create a new entity. Such as overlaying houses for sale over a Google Map.

But more recently the video mashup has come of age thanks to the likes of YouTube.

This is where videos from multiple sources are edited together into a new video. To date, many of these video mashups have been parodies, but even music mashups are being integrated with them to make combined audio-visual mashups.

Mashup films can be broken down into several predominant styles and tropes. Most of the Mashups found on the internet fall into one category and more or less obey the unwritten rules of that class of film. These categories, are: word associated mashups, which like Danger Mouse’s “Grey Album” unite two disparate source materials by a pun or joke found in the name; transgressive mashups which transgress the sexual norms put forth in a film, often subverting hetero-normative portrayals; and overdubbing mashups, which use the images from a film and replaces the soundtrack with new dialogue or dialogue from another work, which undermines the original narrative.[citation needed]

Mashups based on word associations speak more than just for the wit of the appropriator. In principal, these mashups, when executed well, express some of the central creative tenets of modern found footage filmmaking: 1) Narrative film consistently follows the same filmic grammar and rarely diverts from it, making it easy to unify disparate films because of their similarities; and 2) the formulas inherent in narrative film are so well known by audiences that a few stylistic cues (which have been imitated to the point of cliché) can easily alert an audience to the nature of what they are watching. Using these two principals, mashups are highly successful at parodying more than just the films they chose to amalgamate, but also at critiquing and revealing the tools of narrative filmmaking.[citation needed]

Some exceptional word associated mashups include “Must Love Jaws” a combination of the romantic comedy “Must Love Dogs” and “Jaws” in which music cues and humorous scenes turn visual source material from “Jaws” into a story about a man who falls in love with a shark. 8 1/2 Mile is a mashup of Fellini's film "8 1/2" and Curtis Hanson's "8 Mile." One of the best received mashups to date is word associated: "10 Things I Hate About Commandments."
In popular culture, Mashup usually means:

* Mashup (music), a musical genre of songs that consist entirely of parts of other songs
* Mashup (web application hybrid), a website or web application that combines content from more than one source
* Mashup (video), a video that is edited from more than one source to appear as one
* Mashup, in parts of the UK also means a brew, or a pot of tea (colloq. Yorkshire)

by Sasha Frere-Jones
In July of 2003, Jeremy Brown, a.k.a. DJ Reset, took apart a song. Using digital software, Brown isolated instrumental elements of “Debra,” a song by Beck from his 1999 album “Midnite Vultures.” Brown, who is thirty-three and has studied with Max Roach, adjusted the tempo of “Debra” and added live drums and human beat-box noises that he recorded at his small but tidy house in Long Island City. Then he sifted through countless a-cappella vocals archived on several hard drives. Some a-cappellas are on commercially released singles, specifically intended for d.j. use, while others appear on the Internet, having been leaked by people working in the studio where the song was recorded, or sometimes even by the artist.
Mashups find new uses for current digital technology, a new iteration of the cause-and-effect relationship behind almost every change in pop-music aesthetics: the gear changes, and then the music does. If there is an electric guitar of mashup, it is a software package called Acid Pro, which enables one to put loops of different songs both in time and in tune with each other. Mark Vidler, known professionally as Go Home Productions, explained some other benefits of digital technology to me in London not long ago: “You don’t need a distributor, because your distribution is the Internet. You don’t need a record label, because it’s your bedroom, and you don’t need a recording studio, because that’s your computer. You do it all yourself.”
Mashups are known by a number of different names, including:

* Bootlegs (mostly in Europe)
* Boots (but not Booty which is a branch of Electro)
* Mash-ups
* Smashups (or Smash-Ups)
* Bastard pop
* Blends
* Cutups (or Cut-ups)
* Powermixing (Usually the pace has to be sped up to allow for more song to be played and thus cannot play any single blend for the full lenghth of the song)

In addition, more traditional terms such as "edits" or (unauthorized) "remixes" are favored by many "bootleggers" (also known as 'leggers).
Video mashups are the latest genre of mashup. First there were music mashups, where two or more tracks are combined, often with one acapella track by one artist over a second backing track by another.
Though the term "bastard pop" first became popular in 2001, the practice of assembling new songs from purloined elements of other tracks stretches back at least to the 1950s, and, if one extends the definition beyond the realm of pop, precursors can be found in Musique concrète, as well as the classical practice of (re-)arranging traditional folk material and the jazz tradition of reinterpreting standards. In addition, many elements of bastard pop culture have antecedents in hip hop and the DIY ethic of punk.

4 comments:

d. chedwick bryant said...

keeping up with the PlusUltra is a full-time job!

d. chedwick bryant said...

does this one work?

Breakfast at Tiffany's on Pluto?


2 great movies.

plusultra said...

Nobody can keep up with plusultra because plusultra is ever higher ever farther ever better, but thanks for trying. I also enjoy Breakfast at Tiffany's. Audrey Hepburn is so cooky and sweet in that classic film.

d. chedwick bryant said...

C. Murphy is cooky & sweet in "Breakfast on Pluto"